So, the iPad?

 

It’s pretty damn cool.
I’ve largely already known that I’ve wanted to get one, and this past week, the opportunity to purchase one came up, from a coworker of my father’s. The asking price was more than reasonable, and with a paycheck coming, bills under control, I figured it was time as any to get one. My verdict? I like it, although there are some drawbacks to it. Still, it is literally something out of science fiction, when you consider just how short of a time ago computers first came about, and just what they were.
I’ve used my iPhone for over a year now, and have owned several different iPods over the years (and unfortunately, breaking them at points) and this feels like a very good, solid Apple product, even for the first generation line. Originally, I had held off, wanting to wait for an upgraded version of the computer, for A) improvements in the new line, of B) a dirt cheap one when they had to get rid of inventory. Price notwithstanding, The first day or so of playing with it has left me very impressed with what it can do. Moreover, because of my own situation, there are significant differences in how I’m going to be using it, as opposed to my iPhone.
Currently, I don’t have internet or cable at home. (And, to answer a lot of friends who’ve asked how can I live like that: I read. And I use my phone to check twitter/facebook/e-mail). This division between the two devices has limited what I can put onto the iPad (for now – I’ll likely get internet at some point), leaving me to use it for a couple of tasks that I’ve used my desktop or work laptop for. Certainly, as I begin to write more for other places, such as io9, SF Signal and Tor, I’ll probably just begin to write more on this, simply because it’s very easy to cart around the house, prop up and type something somewhere. I’ve pulled over some of my music from the music library for my phone, although different playlists, such as most of my classical and soundtrack songs, because it helps me focus when I’m writing.
I’ve also placed a couple of television episodes from one of my favorite shows on it, and I’m impressed with the quality of the screen, and that I can watch it in several different ways. I do a lot of my television watching based on what I’ve downloaded from iTunes, and while laptops are portable, this is far easier to carry around and to watch something somewhere, and represents a far better alternative than watching things on my iPhone. As a result, TV is off the phone, and onto something that’s far more superior.
What really sold me on this though, was the word processor, Pages, and the keyboard that the seller threw in with my purchase (which made this a really good deal, in my eyes).  The dock keyboard is really cool, and almost the size of a proper one, which makes typing on this for longer things very good, although I’m still not sold on the on-screen keyboard. I’m used to writing on the phone with its own keyboard, and while I’ve adapted to that, I have yet to adapt to the larger keyboard using all of my fingers. The regular keyboard is nice because I actually feel the key depressing under the weight of my fingers, whereas the onscreen one is just tapping the same surface over and over again. It largely works, but with more errors. Still, it works pretty well. Pages itself is something that I like, because I can upload regular Word files to the program, but also export documents that I type up, or eventually, upload them to the internet without the middleman.
What’s surprised me the most is iBooks, which I’m really growing to like. I’ve acquired various eBooks over the past year, but without anything to really read them on. The phone is too small, and I dislike reading things on the computer screen for page after page. During graduate school, I just printed things out. The bookstore has a number of free classics that have interested me quite a bit, and I’ve built a small library of books that I’ve wanted to read, and a couple that I have, for the times that I’ve found myself looking for something to do, but without a book, which does happen on occasion. Reading on a screen is really something that doesn’t interest me, but the convenience factor is a boost, and it’s not as strange as I thought it might be. Still, I prefer the ink and paper publication over the digital one.
At the end of the day, it’s a sleek, science fictiony computer, one that comes a very long way from the first computers that I learned on when I was in elementary school – the one piece Macintosh 128ks that still look very cool to me, with their grey screens, keyboards and clunky mice. It’s interesting to see the progression, and I suspect that this style of computing is here to stay. On any given day, I don’t need to open my work laptop – it’s docked, and hooked up to a monitor, and within the next decade, I wouldn’t be surprised if the laptop itself is killed off, in favor of something that’s much smaller, and with fewer moving parts, with the ability to hook into a much larger network and external keyboards and monitors.
The first time that I saw something like this was in a science fiction film, and it’s interesting to be living in the future.
About these ads

8 thoughts on “So, the iPad?

  1. The remark about the iPad that’s stuck with me the most clearly so far is that it’s a device for consuming content, not creating it. The iPod still holds the title in that arena, but it’s still a perceptive assessment of the iPad. It handles reading and media viewing great, I hear, but it falls down at creating content well on its own without peripherals.

    But then, I was always suspicious that characters in the modern Star Trek series plonking away at their PADDs with a stylus weren’t really getting much done.

    • Eeeh, I’m not sure I’ll buy that, it’s certainly geared towards consumption, given what people do with the internet, but as someone who writes a lot? I think that I’ll be creating plenty. Similarly, if anyone is sufficiently motivated, they’ll find a way to turn it into a creation device – a friend of mine bought one after lambasting it when it was first announced, because he found an application that allowed him to draw with an aftermarket stylus. I think that the saying, if there’s a will, there’s a way, applies here.

      • That’s why I stipulated without peripherals. People will figure out how to create with the iPad because it’s shiny and wonderful. But I don’t think that was a design goal on Apple’s part.

      • Oh, I see what you mean. True, but there’s no lack of peripherals.

        I think that the biggest issue when it comes to that is that this is a completely new device, and a new product line – I suspect that Apple looked towards what they’ve been building, and built something that works well to consume all of it. But, as people figure out how to use it, it’ll change over time, and competitors will fill in the product gaps for what is demanded.

  2. Pingback: So, the iPad? « worlds in a grain of sand | Media Point - O Ponto de Encontro de todos os interessados nos Media!

  3. Pingback: Media Point » So, the iPad? « worlds in a grain of sand

  4. Pingback: So, the iPad? « worlds in a grain of sand | Media Point

  5. Pingback: So, the iPad? « worlds in a grain of sand « Media Point

Comments are closed.