MEME | Gollancz SF Masterworks

As noted earlier, I’m part of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Masterworks Review blog, and they’ve come up with an interesting meme, how many of these have been read?

What I’ve bolded are books read and italics means I own it, but I’ve been meaning to read it. This list also includes new Masterwork releases coming out later this year and the first section of roman numerals of the list are a special run of hardcovers in the series, which are also in the numbered series.

I – Dune – Frank Herbert
II – The Left Hand of Darkness – Ursula K. Le Guin
III – The Man in the High Castle – Philip K. Dick
IV – The Stars My Destination – Alfred Bester
V – A Canticle for Leibowitz – Walter M. Miller, Jr.
VI – Childhood’s End – Arthur C. Clarke
VII – The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress – Robert A. Heinlein
VIII – Ringworld – Larry Niven
IX – The Forever War – Joe Haldeman
X – The Day of the Triffids – John Wyndham

1 – The Forever War – Joe Haldeman
2 – I Am Legend – Richard Matheson
3 – Cities in Flight – James Blish
4 – Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? – Philip K. Dick
5 – The Stars My Destination – Alfred Bester
6 – Babel-17 – Samuel R. Delany
7 – Lord of Light – Roger Zelazny
8 – The Fifth Head of Cerberus – Gene Wolfe
9 – Gateway – Frederik Pohl
10 – The Rediscovery of Man – Cordwainer Smith

11 – Last and First Men – Olaf Stapledon (Will be reviewing)
12 – Earth Abides – George R. Stewart
13 – Martian Time-Slip – Philip K. Dick
14 – The Demolished Man – Alfred Bester
15 – Stand on Zanzibar – John Brunner
16 – The Dispossessed – Ursula K. Le Guin
17 – The Drowned World – J. G. Ballard
18 – The Sirens of Titan – Kurt Vonnegut
19 – Emphyrio – Jack Vance
20 – A Scanner Darkly – Philip K. Dick
21 – Star Maker – Olaf Stapledon
22 – Behold the Man – Michael Moorcock
23 – The Book of Skulls – Robert Silverberg
24 – The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds – H. G. Wells
25 – Flowers for Algernon – Daniel Keyes (Will Be reviewing)
26 – Ubik – Philip K. Dick
27 – Timescape – Gregory Benford
28 – More Than Human – Theodore Sturgeon
29 – Man Plus – Frederik Pohl
30 – A Case of Conscience – James Blish

31 – The Centauri Device – M. John Harrison
32 – Dr. Bloodmoney – Philip K. Dick
33 – Non-Stop – Brian Aldiss
34 – The Fountains of Paradise – Arthur C. Clarke
35 – Pavane – Keith Roberts
36 – Now Wait for Last Year – Philip K. Dick
37 – Nova – Samuel R. Delany
38 – The First Men in the Moon – H. G. Wells
39 – The City and the Stars – Arthur C. Clarke
40 – Blood Music – Greg Bear

41 – Jem – Frederik Pohl
42 – Bring the Jubilee – Ward Moore
43 – VALIS – Philip K. Dick
44 – The Lathe of Heaven – Ursula K. Le Guin
45 – The Complete Roderick – John Sladek
46 – Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said – Philip K. Dick
47 – The Invisible Man – H. G. Wells
48 – Grass – Sheri S. Tepper
49 – A Fall of Moondust – Arthur C. Clarke
50 – Eon – Greg Bear

51 – The Shrinking Man – Richard Matheson
52 – The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch – Philip K. Dick
53 – The Dancers at the End of Time – Michael Moorcock
54 – The Space Merchants – Frederik Pohl and Cyril M. Kornbluth
55 – Time Out of Joint – Philip K. Dick
56 – Downward to the Earth – Robert Silverberg
57 – The Simulacra – Philip K. Dick
58 – The Penultimate Truth – Philip K. Dick
59 – Dying Inside – Robert Silverberg
60 – Ringworld – Larry Niven

61 – The Child Garden – Geoff Ryman
62 – Mission of Gravity – Hal Clement
63 – A Maze of Death – Philip K. Dick
64 – Tau Zero – Poul Anderson
65 – Rendezvous with Rama – Arthur C. Clarke
66 – Life During Wartime – Lucius Shepard
67 – Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang – Kate Wilhelm
68 – Roadside Picnic – Arkady and Boris Strugatsky
69 – Dark Benediction – Walter M. Miller, Jr.
70 – Mockingbird – Walter Tevis

71 – Dune – Frank Herbert
72 – The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress – Robert A. Heinlein
73 – The Man in the High Castle – Philip K. Dick
74 – Inverted World – Christopher Priest
75 – Kurt Vonnegut – Cat’s Cradle
76 – H.G. Wells – The Island of Dr. Moreau
77 – Arthur C. Clarke – Childhood’s End
78 – H.G. Wells – The Time Machine
79 – Samuel R. Delany – Dhalgren (July 2010)
80 – Brian Aldiss – Helliconia (August 2010)

81 – H.G. Wells – Food of the Gods (Sept. 2010)
82 – Jack Finney – The Body Snatchers (Oct. 2010)
83 – Joanna Russ – The Female Man (Nov. 2010)
84 – M.J. Engh – Arslan (Dec. 2010

So what’s my count? 15 read, with a couple that I own. Hopefully, I’ll be getting to the two books of my own, Flowers for Algernon and Last and First Men, soon, after I finish up a couple of other things, but when they’re done, they’ll be up on the SF and Fantasy Materworks Reading Blog.

Bit of an edit here, 6 or more months on. I never actually ended up getting around to finishing or reviewing either book that had been my assignment – something I’ve been unhappy about, but more pressing matters have come up. Hopefully though, I’ll be able to get to some of them at some point in the future!

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12 thoughts on “MEME | Gollancz SF Masterworks

  1. I highly recommend the Dick books, especially “The Man In The High Castle”. You will especially like that one being a student of military history. “A Scanner Darkly” shouldn’t be a science fiction movie at all, it is an autobiography that has a few science fiction elements because Dick didn’t think he could sell a mainstream novel.

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  3. Its fascinating to see what others have and have read at times. I did so much reading during my youth that I still rely on that today as an adult. I mean the reading I did at home because I wanted to, not the stuff they made me read for school – sometimes I loved it anyways, other times I just had no choice.

    Lately, I have tended to read more nonfiction in part because I became dimly aware that my knowledge of how life really works was in some ways all too clear and accurate, but in other ways not clear at all.

    Off the top of my head: favorite SF in book format
    1) The Wrinkle in Time
    2) 1984
    3) Fahrenheit 451
    4) CJ Cherryh Rim Runners
    5) Armor by John Steakley
    **Actually, I found #2, & 3 to be very scary.

    A lot of it I read because my older siblings had. This did make sure i read above my school grade for years, which helped me to learn a lot at home. Sometimes the names escape me. Most of the other leisure reading was fantasy: Chronicles of Narnia for kids, and Sword of Shannara and JRR Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings for adults.

    6) military SF but I don’t even know who the author was, or what it was called. Let’s say, “50 of those”.

    • Lists are really hard, and given that they’re generally, pretty specific to the people who create the list – someone brought up a point that there’s very few women who are represented on that list, who probably should be. Plus, tastes change with time. I do agree that Wrinkle in Time, 1984 and 451 should all be there, but I haven’t read Armor or Rim Runners.

      The other part of this list is that they’re well established works, ones that help to define and shape the genre, and are books that alter the thinking of those involved in creating and consuming the fiction that’s represented – that list is very small, and very few books really stand out in the field there.

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