The Reading List

Still working through a pile of books, and to keep things straight, this is what I’ve got going:

Currently Reading:

Ambassadors from Earth: Pioneering Explorations with Unmanned Spacecraft, Jay Gallentine
This is a book that has been on my to-read list for a little while, and after several science fiction novels, it feels like a good diversion while not getting too far away from the genre. This book documents the history behind unmanned space probes, and thus far, it’s an interesting, and different subject than the other books in the Outward Odyssey series.

Pattern Recognition, William Gibson
After reading through River of Gods, I had the urge to read some more of William Gibson. I’ve read only one of his earlier books, and this one is one that’s been kicking around my shelves for a while. Plus, his new book, Zero History, has just been released, and that looks to be quite interesting, as does Spook Country.

Stories, edited by Neil Gaiman
I’m picking away at this book story by story. Some of them, such as Jodi Picoult’s story, was absolutely heartbreaking, and the anthology is just simply fantastic to read. The stories are short enough to be a good break as I read chapters from other books.

Learning to Eat Soup With a Knife: Counterinsurgency Lessons from Malaya and Vietnam, John Nagl
Nagl has been in the news lately as the United States begins to draw down its forces overseas in Iraq and Afghanistan. This book looks to Malaya and Vietnam to the experiences there and how an organization such as the Army needs to learn and adapt to changing conditions.

Next Up:

The City and the City, China Mieville
This book has been winning awards for most of the year, and as announced today, is one of the co-winners of the Hugo Award (Along with The Windup Girl). I’ve heard numerous good things, and I think that it’s about time to crack it open.

Footprints in the Dust: The Epic Voyages of Apollo 1969-1975, edited by Colin Burgess
Same case as Ambassadors from Earth, except this book picks up the rest of the Apollo stories that haven’t been told yet. I also can’t wait to read this one.

Nights of Villjamur, Mark Charan Newton
Mark Newton’s first book – it’s come highly recommended from several fellow blogger people, and it looks like a really good read.

Robert A. Heinlein: Volume 1: Learning Curve 1907 – 1948, William H. Patterson Jr.
Heinlein’s authorized biography. This should be fascinating.

Andvari’s Ring, Arthur Peterson
Book of translated Norse epic poetry. It’s not as pretentious as it sounds: this is a fantastic mythological tale, and I was about halfway through before I set it down for something else.

Kraken, China Mieville
After The City and The City, Kraken is another Mieville book that I really want to get into.

The Dervish House, Ian McDonald
After reading River of Gods by McDonald, this book is high up on my anticipated reads. Set in Turkey, a terrorist bombing in 2027 puts 6 story lines into motion, in a similar formula to his other book.

Masked, edited by Lou Anders
Anthology of superhero stories – I’ve read the first couple, and really liked what I’ve read thus far. I love the idea of superheroes, but not in a comic book. Austin Grossman’s book, Soon I Will Be Invincible, is another excellent example of superhero prose.

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “The Reading List

  1. Pattern Recognition, William Gibson

    oohh, good book! I can’t wait to hear what you think of it! Maybe just as a tease, I’ll post an old review I wrote? I felt it was one of Gibson’s more accessible works, a little more on the social SF and a little less on the cyberpunk stuff.

    • I’m enjoying it thus far, although I suspect that it will be a bit more of a dated book. It’s certainly predicted the rise of viral marketing, and I’m not really seeing the science fictional elements to it, but it I still have about halfway to go. Feel free to point out the review – I’d be interested in seeing what other people think of it.

      • I posted my review of Pattern Recognition. I wrote the article a while ago, but the book came out a while ago, so it can all be dated together. Good book, very accessible.

        It’s certainly not as SF’y as Gibson’s other stuff (I haven’t read any of his newer stuff, tho), but for me it had a really nice vibe to it.

Comments are closed.