A Couple Random Things

This past weekend was the Wizard World Boston comic convention, held at the Hynes Convention Center in downtown Boston, something that the New England Garrison has been planning for almost a year now. This has been quite the year for conventions for the group. We were at the Boston and Granite City Comic Cons earlier this year, then Celebration 5, and now this one, with SupermegaFest coming up.

Generally, I’m not a fan of conventions. I don’t like standing around, waiting for people to take pictures of me with them. I never really feel that it’s a good use of my time and so forth, but this one had a bunch of options to allow us to really interact with the general public: A Jabba the Hutt puppet that people could pose next to, and a shooting gallery, where we raised around $840 for Autism Speaks, a charity that the NEG works with closely.

The weekend was also Megan’s first time at a con, along with the added bonus of getting to see some of the people from Buffy the Vampire Slayer (I’m not a huge fan, but she and some of her friends enjoyed it – We inducted James Marsters into the 501st as an honorary member.) Adam West and Burt Ward (Batman and Robin – at $60, they were too expensive to really talk to), Doug Jones’ Manager (Jones himself was talking to someone else when I was around) and Christopher Golden, who wrote the book Baltimore, or, the Steadfast Tin Soldier and the Vampire, which I coincidentally picked up at the same con.

The opportunity to take part in the shooting gallery was definitely the highlight, because I could act out a bit and be really ridiculous with it. Kids, somewhat unsurprisingly, are really good shots with dart guns, and I was hit in the face and head a lot. Something about a Storm Trooper falling flat on his face seems to get people laughing, so that made it worth it. I’ve got a couple of pictures here.

I’ve been doing a bit more reading lately, and I’ve got a stack of really good books stacked up next to my bed. Paolo Bacigalupi’s Pump Six and Other Stories is the book that I’m carrying around at the moment, which is a fantastic collection from a fantastic author, while I’m also reading the aforementioned Baltimore, which is proving to be a really cool read (and with some awesome illustrations from Mike Mignola), Cherie Priest’s Dreadnought, which is proving to be fun (but not quite as much fun as her prior book Boneshaker, but better than Clementine), Masked, edited by Lou Anders, which is a fun, but somewhat dense anthology of superhero stories, and Nights of Villjamur, by Mark Charan Newton, which is proving to be a slow read, and unfortunately, not as good as I was led to believe. (It’s interesting thus far though). I’ve got a couple of other books on the horizon that I really want to read before the end of the year: Ian McDonald’s The Dervish House and China Mieville’s Kraken.

I’m thrilled at this pile of books, and some of the other ones that I’ve read already this year – The City and the City (China Mieville), Pattern Recognition (William Gibson), Stories (edited by Neil Gaiman), Spellbound (Blake Charleton), How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe (Charles Yu), Hundred Thousand Kingdoms (N.K. Jemisin, and the River of Gods (Ian McDonald, just to name a few, because I’ve fallen into company in person and online that have pointed me to some fantastic books and I feel that I’ve learned and grown as a reader and writer because of them. There’s been some duds of reads this year, but overall? I’ve been pulled into fantastic world after fantastic world.

Still, reading is something that I enjoy, and I’ve been finding that I really don’t enjoy the entire book-blogger environment that I discovered. Too much drama, complaints about how SF/F isn’t perceived as a legitimate genre, sucking up to authors and so many reviews a week / month that I can’t believe that people can read and retain the contents of dozens of books a year. It’s not for me, and I’ve found that I’ve got little patience and interest in it. I’ll stick with my moderate pace and go from there.

John Scalzi posted up a fascinating essay earlier today, Today I Don’t Have To Think About…, which fully and utterly puts one into one’s place. After being amongst and listening to a number of coworkers, family members and friends complain about how things are going in their lives and the drama that ensues, this is a really good thing to read, because there are people who are a helluva lot worse off than me in the world. It’s hard to remember that sometimes, but it’s worth remembering. I’ve taken the essay and printed it out. One copy went onto my desk’s wall. I’m not sure where the other nine will end up, but they should be read.

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