Book Review: Other Half of the Sky, edited by Athena Andreadis

In the introduction for The Other Half of the Sky, the book’s editor Athena Andreadis describes space opera in less than glowing terms: “Likewise, most SF aficionados conflate space opera with galactic empires, messianic anti/heroes (invariably white men) and gizmos up the wazoo, from death stars to individually customized viruses. And therein lies a tale… More Book Review: Other Half of the Sky, edited by Athena Andreadis

Review: Love Minus Eighty, by Will McIntosh

A common trait in science fiction literature is the promotion of the possibilities that are afforded by technology. The standard of living for much of the population in the United States and other western countries seem to confirm this idea: technology makes our lives better. What’s less understood is how with technology, complications arise in… More Review: Love Minus Eighty, by Will McIntosh

Book Review: A Natural History of Dragons: A Memoir by Lady Trent, by Marie Brennan

Marie Brennan’s alternate Europe seen in A Natural History of Dragons: A Memoir by Lady Trent, follows a young Victorian girl who has become obsessed with dragons. Writing at the end of a long life, she has begun to write her memoirs about her life’s work and adventures: the study of the mythical beasts. In… More Book Review: A Natural History of Dragons: A Memoir by Lady Trent, by Marie Brennan

Book Review: The Burn Zone, by James K. Decker

The fast-paced world of James K. Decker’s The Burn Zone is an excellent example of a growing movement within the genre: a recognition that Planet Earth is a complicated and diverse place. Here, we have a society that isn’t a cookie cutter facsimile of the United States and where the protagonist isn’t a Caucasian male. Taking place… More Book Review: The Burn Zone, by James K. Decker

Book Review: The Office of Mercy by Ariel Djanikian

It’s little wonder that Ariel Djanikian’s debut novel is being marketed as a novel for the Hunger Gamesgeneration: a futuristic world where conventional society has collapsed is the setting for The Office of Mercy, a utopian/post apocalyptic novel that presents a dark look at the extent of sciences and a twisted form of ethics. Taking… More Book Review: The Office of Mercy by Ariel Djanikian

Book Review: London Falling, by Paul Cornell

After Rob Toshack, London crime boss, dies a horrific death while being interrogated, four members of the London Metropolitan Police Service encounter something in a crime scene that gives them the Sight. Transformed, they’re now able to access an entirely new London, one that’s more dangerous than they ever thought possible. Paul Cornell’s latest novel… More Book Review: London Falling, by Paul Cornell